Thursday, 21 July 2011

Psoriasis and Eczema

The most prevalent autoimmune disease in the United States, psoriasis affects up to 7.5 million Americans and is thought to arise from a combination of genetic and environmental triggers, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation. Eczema, on the other hand, is thought to be an allergic response and often occurs simultaneously in those with asthma or food allergies, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. It is often outgrown by adulthood.
Psoriasis lesions in the study participants contained large numbers of so-called Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas eczema lesions had higher amounts of Th2 and Th22 cells. The researchers expanded their testing to include five patients with psoriasis and skin allergies to nickel -- a much more common combination that prompts an eczema-like reaction -- to confirm a similar T-cell response to psoriasis.
The study also found that all eczema lesions, but none in psoriasis, harbored Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, confirming that T-cells in psoriasis appear to prompt an innate immune response that's different from what is seen in eczema.
 Dr. Jerry Bagel, a spokesman for the National Psoriasis Foundation and associate clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University in New York City, said the research indicates that eczema and psoriasis "are clearly distinct entities, but there is some crossover immunologically." - usnews.com/health-news
 While there is no known cure for psoriasis, eczema can be treated successfully with a cream containing Manuka UMF honey this natural cream is able to control the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria which allows the eczema condition to heal naturally.
In addition to Manuka honey, this cream also contains natural extracts and oils reknowned for their skin calming properties which relieves the itching sensation and the desire to scratch the area, further enhancing the healing process.

No comments:

Post a Comment